An Infant Passport Is A Matter Of National Security

  • Print Article |
  • Send to a Friend |
  • |
  • Add to Google |

Although some people seem to think otherwise, infants engaging in international travel must have a valid U.S. passport. All U.S. citizens must have a valid passport for international travel. An infant passport is very similar to normal passports, with a few exceptions.

While it may seem silly to force an infant to carry a passport, there are several practical reasons that make it necessary for all U.S. citizens to carry passports during international travel. First of all, it is a matter of national security and border security.

The government needs to know who is entering and leaving a country at a given time. Allowing infants to forego passports would make it easy to sneak in infant illegal immigrants--an action that seems innocuous, but could have serious consequences twenty years down the line.

Requiring passports for infants is also an issue of human rights. Requiring children and infants to carry passports helps to seriously curb illegal human trafficking. By requiring infant passports, the government has made it much more difficult to deal in the illicit trafficking of children.

Applying for an infant passport is rather similar to applying for an adult passport, save a few practical differences. Obviously and infant will not be able to fill out his or her own passport form. A parent will have to fill out the forms, and a parent will have to aid in the passport photo process.

Likewise, an infant will not be able to sign his or her passport. This is a bit more significant than the child’s inability to fill out an application. In situations where a child is too young to sign his or her own name on their passport the parent must co-sign the passport.

If a parent needs to sign a passport in place of a child, the parent must print the full name of the child, and then beside the child’s name, they must sign their own name and write their relationship to the child (mother, father, guardian, etc…) in parenthesis next to their own signature.

Ideally, the parent traveling with the infant should be the parent to sign the passport. However, this is not necessary, as other laws ensure both parents consent to child passports.

In order for a child younger than sixteen to obtain a passport, the child must receive written consent from both parents or guardians. This is part of new law passed in an attempt to prevent international custody disputes.

A child under sixteen must apply for a passport in person, and both parents must sign form DS-11, in person, together, with the child. A child cannot receive a passport without both parents present.

Clearly, there are a lot of sound reasons behind the laws that require infant passports. Because international travel is always a concern for national security, it is imperative that all citizens carry their passports, even infants and newborns. Anyone with an infant considering international travel should most definitely take steps to start the passport application process as soon as possible.

Rate this Article:
  • Article Word Count: 396
  • |
  • Total Views: 487
  • |
  • permalink
  • Print Article |
  • Send to a Friend |
  • |
  • Add to Google |
>