Some Ways To Get An Emergency US Passport

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Travel plans have a reputation for changing without warning. Even the most detailed and specific itineraries are sometimes forced to experience alterations. A much-anticipated business trip is suddenly happening next week instead of next year, for example.

Or, maybe the original plans haven't changed but somehow you can't find your passport and realize that replacing it might be impossible in such a short time frame. An entire trip may be in jeopardy. These nightmare scenarios are custom-made for the creation of an emergency passport.

The actual process of applying for and receiving a standard U.S. Passport is not necessarily complicated but there can be a somewhat lengthy completion time. This often runs at least six weeks, and during peak travel times can take even longer.

Those applying for this document normally are required to present proof of U.S. Citizenship, a filled-in application form with two new or recent passport photographs, a photo ID such as a driver's license, and enough money to pay the fees. Often this process is a function of the U.S. Post Office, which routinely handles the procedure.

But what about an unexpected trip abroad that will require a passport as soon as possible? If you find that you must travel within 14 days and have not yet applied for your passport or a necessary foreign visa, the U.S. Government has regional passport agencies designed to assist you in these situations. Someone needing documentation in less than two weeks for international travel or needing a visa within four weeks can call for an appointment at a Regional Passport Agency.

These regional Passport Agency offices are easily found on the internet, located in U.S. Government travel websites. These offices are very helpful, of course, but are not the only option available when a traveler needs to speed up the process of documentation.

Also found on the internet are an entire host of private businesses who have become specialists in nearly every facet of passport detail. If your personal time is limited, a search of these websites will probably help you understand the services they provide and any fees that are required.

These practices and suggestions apply mainly to existing or new passports. When traveling, the unthinkable can happen. The papers can be lost or stolen and a citizen may be stranded without documentation. Having this happen can destroy the trip of a lifetime if not remedied as quickly as possible.

One piece of advice that should never be ignored is to make a photocopy of your current passport. Store it carefully, packed in a completely different bag if possible. Having a copy can truly speed up the replacement process. Without it, replacement is often slower.

But bad things still can happen to good planners. If the passport is lost or stolen, remember that you can contact the local U.S. Consulate or Embassy. Within that overall group is a unit called the American Citizens Service, usually located within the consulate section.

To begin the emergency issuance process they will need all the details of your planned travel. This information may be helpful circumventing some of the bureaucracy that tends to slow things down. In addition, the Service will ask you to complete a new application. They must be absolutely sure of your correct and legitimate identification before replacing any document.

They will require the details of your personal information. This means they will want your full name, place and date of birth, and the statistics on the old passport including the date, location of issue, and passport number if available. Obviously, if you have made a photocopy beforehand, this information will be immeasurably easier to provide.

In addition, they will need a sworn statement or affidavit before a consular officer affirming the loss or theft. A police report is not necessary, but may be helpful in cases of thievery. Once these details are verified, the information can then be confirmed through a database called the U.S. Passport Verification System. The original data will then be retrieved.

For security reasons, some people will be asked for further proof of citizenship and name clearance when requesting their replacement passport. Often this information can be verified by others in your travel group. Sometimes it must be clarified by contacting relatives back home. If this proves difficult to obtain, proof is often available through previous government passport information. Those citizens who may be destitute due to a natural disaster or calamitous robbery, Emergency Passport fees may be waived until funds are available again for that individual. The end result will be an Emergency US Passport that allows you to continue traveling with a minimum of disruption.

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