Designing Effective Personal Training Business Cards

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Designing effective personal training business cards is one of several important actions today's personal training professionals will need to learn something about. After all, no single item can at once be an advertisement and an essential part of any business marketing campaign. Many times, it's the first thing somebody you've met personally will expect from you.

Even though we all have an idea of fitness training as being a kind of operation in which the proprietor is dressed in casual attire or even, heaven forbid, some Lycra/spandex, any smart personal trainer will quickly come to realize that fitness is a business. And in business, the exchange of a business card or the giving of that same card to potential client will say a lot about the seriousness of the business and the proprietor.

Business cards are part of what is referred to in the business world as "customer acquisition." The items that you should be trying to spread around as much as possible are little introductions of not only you but also your personal training enterprise. If they aren't professional-looking and comprehensive, they can actually hurt the chances of customer acquisition.

Think of it like this: A possible client won't know you or even care all that much about you. What he or she will know, though, are the desires or needs they may have for good personal fitness. A high-quality card, with a good logo, can go a long way towards helping him or her make that final decision.

If a business is truly operated on a professional level instead of out of the trunk of a car, for instance, then the chance of acquisition can be increased by up to 85 percent in some industries, according to recent studies. This is no different in the personal training game. So what, then, are the minimum elements of a good card? For starters, your name should be featured. And this doesn't mean a nickname, like Joe "The Weight Pro" Blow, to use a somewhat humorous example. Use a standard form of address such as Joe E. Blow, which comes across much more professionally.

Next, make sure you have a job title inserted. You may be the sole proprietor and only employee, but adding something like "Chief Fitness Coordinator," or even "President and CEO" (which you are) makes for a much better presentation when it comes to client servicing and acquisition.

Always have contact information, such as phone numbers and email addresses listed on the card. And try to make sure the email is something professional and not, for example, "big.stud@so-and-so dot.com. Save the personal addresses for personal interactions. Lastly, make sure you have a professional business name on the card, even if you're running the business from your van.

Designing effective personal training business cards really is much like designing any other set of business cards. Personal training and fitness on one level is all about how well the trainer does his or her training job. But it also is a real-world business that has all the elements of any other business. Given that, it makes sense that a good-looking business card that won't embarrass the proprietor when it's passed out be an essential item to have. Given that your business card will have your website address on it, then next question that you need to ask yourself is "how do i get traffic to my personal training site?"

Sherman Goldberg is an expert author dedicated to bringing you great fitness marketing techniques for your fitness marketing and personal trainer marketing, and so much more which can be found at WWW.KickBackLife.com.

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