About Boxer Puppies

  • Print Article |
  • Send to a Friend |
  • |
  • Add to Google |

Originating from Germany, the Boxer is the result of the cross between mastiff and bulldog breeds. Boxers have a compact and powerful build and are recognized by the muzzle, which is short and comes to a distinctive stop. It is quite popular around the world as both a house pet and a guard dog.

Boxer dogs are of average intelligence and reply well to training. They are willful so when training a dog of this breed, make sure to be firm with them. Bad habits are picked up easily for Boxers but good ones are as well. The Boxer is not aggressive although it looks the part. In order for it to be good with children, others dogs and animals, Boxer puppies require socialization at an early age. They are very spirited and frolicsome causing them to be great family pets. The Boxer is also on its guard with strangers, which makes it protective and a good guard dog to an owner and their family.

The average height of a full-grown male Boxer is twenty-two to twenty-five inches with a weight of sixty-six to seventy-one pounds. Female Boxers are slightly smaller with an average weight of fifty-five to sixty-pounds and an average height of twenty-one to twenty-three inches.A Boxer will have a litter of anywhere between two to ten puppies, with a litter of six Boxer puppies most commonly found. The breed has a life expectancy of eleven to fourteen years.

The Boxer puppies can live in an apartment as long as it is taken out on walks daily. They do well in a house with a yard, whether it is large or small. Boxers are very active and need to be able to run around as often as possible, even if it is indoors. The breed is very sensitive to temperature; it’ll heat up quickly in the summer and get cold just as fast in the winter.

The coat of a Boxer is short and smooth so it doesn't require a lot of maintenance when grooming. Brush the coat every so often and give the Boxer a bath when it is needed to keep his coat in the best condition. Boxers shed an average amount of their fur.

Lymphoma, heart murmurs, and inherited epithelial dysplasia are more common in Boxers. They are inclined to tumors and can also lose their hearing.

Knowing what you now know of Boxers, appreciate what a special breed they are. Whether you are absolutely sure you want a Boxer as a household pet or are still deciding, remember all the fun you can have with a Boxer for years to come.

Rate this Article:
  • Article Word Count: 432
  • |
  • Total Views: 45
  • |
  • permalink
  • Print Article |
  • Send to a Friend |
  • |
  • Add to Google |
Popular Articles by Jimmy Carter
>