Requirements and the Creative Brief

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What does my perfect customer look like?

The book helps, because a creative person needs to gain focus from producing a Creative Brief and on the way discover the Requirements that will help in completing the writing, painting or sculpturing project.

What makes my perfect customer tick?

They need to feel comfortable in producing the idea that leads to their next project.

What do I want my perfect customer to expect of me?

Because a book that communicates to them the map and the route to take in their mind then helps by giving comfort to begin producing their Creative Brief.

What do I need to improve about my business to attract more perfect customers?

Write and Publish more books that communicate and enable them to benefit from reading the books and obtain a win win outcome. join the club for free: 

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 Anna Freud, the founder of child psychoanalysis,

said: "Creative minds have always been known to survive any kind of bad training."

 How can we catch the valuable drops of requirements through the rain of information?

A lot of techniques can be used in the Requirement process. We will explore six techniques for requirements gathering: Questionnaire, Document Analysis, Interviews, Brainstorming, Use Cases and Prototyping.

 However, there are still other techniques that can be used for the same purposes and even newer techniques are being developed. From the six techniques I just mentioned, no single one of them can meet all needs, so it is important to apply a set of techniques in the requirements gathering process. The document that is born from the clarified requirements is the Creative brief. At the end of this presentation, to demonstrate the scalability of the requirement gathering techniques and the creative brief, we will walk through a small scale project example.

 There is a memorable passage in Alice in Wonderland, where Alice came to a fork in the road. She asked the Cheshire cat, "Which road shall I take?" The cat replied, "It depends on where you want to go." Alice replied, "I don't care where so long as it is somewhere." The cat responds, "Then it doesn't matter which way you go."

 I find an important business lesson in that passage. If you don't know where you are going, how will you know when you get there? And that's why we need requirements. The requirements describe where we want to go, not how to get there. The contents are geared more toward an online design, which is directly affected from my latest work experience. I'll be using the term "application" to associate to the project or initiative in question. Nevertheless, any of the above techniques and Creative Brief could be used for print design, advertising, copy writing, etc.

 Joseph Joubert, French philosopher said: "He who has imagination without learning has wings and no feet."

Buy the book at  http://stores.lulu.com/store.php?fAcctID=858453

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