The Importance of Asphalt Pavement Seal Coating

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Seal coating pavement will save loads of cash in repair and renovation expenses. Due to the substance composition of asphalt, it can be susceptible to destruction from the weather. Salt, gasoline and car grease also harm it. The first sign of harm is the color of the pavement changing; asphalt will shift from the lush dark to a lighter gray. Then, diminutive cracks start to form in the pavement, which grow to be worse over time. Unsealed asphalt typically needs restoration within a couple years, in addition to a fresh overlay that should be applied every seven years. The costs of service plus overlay can total as much as piles of money through the years, and produce inconvenience to owners during the time that the repairs are taking place.

Property owners can care for their commitment by applying a seal coat over new asphalt. Sealcoat protects the top layer of asphalt because of it's chemical structure that doesn't allow anything to filter through. In consequence, gas spills, oil spills, ice and water can't leak into the pavement as easily.

There are two varieties of seal coat are available: coal tar pit emulsion and asphalt emulsion. Both have their own quirks.

Coal tar pit emulsion (CTPE) has been around since the 1950's. It's compromised of coal tar, clay and water, that results in a substance that is easy to use in regular asphalt temperatures. Coal tar pit emulsion is more resistant to oil, gas and grease. The Federal Aviation Administration requires this type of seal coating be used at airfields since it is much more effective at resisting jet gasoline permeation than asphalt emulsion seal coats.

Asphalt emulsion sealcoats usually are not quite as effective at beating gas, oil and grease, but you can find benefits to this type of sealer. Made of soap emulsions or clay-stabilized emulsion and pavement stabilizer, asphalt emulsion sealcoats don't have the same strong tar stench as CTPE. They're safer for employees implementing the sealcoating. Coal tar pit emulsion may cause skin irritation and burning in addition to respiratory irritation; whereas asphalt emulsion will not.

Property owners should pick the type of pavement seal coat dependent on the place and what the pavement will be used for. If the asphalt will be applied in driveways or locations there won't be much traffic, asphalt emulsion seal coats is often the best choice. If the area is prone to gasoline or oil spills (such as a service bay or fuel station), a coal tar pit emulsion sealcoat is recommended.

All pavement sealcoats are distributed in highly concentrated formula and must be created at the job site. Sealer is mixed with water and either sand or aggregate. The maker will provide the percentage of water that must be mixed (typically 25 to 30 percent), plus the amount of sand or aggregate to be added (typically two to three pounds). To mix, figure 25 to 30 gallons of water for every 100 gallons of sealcoat, and 200 to 300 pounds of sand for every 100 gallons of seal coat. It's always important to keep to the manufacturers' numbers for sand and aggregate quality and amount to avoid a sealcoating that's too messy, thick or absorbent.

 

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