Children of Smokers Miss More School Days than Others

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A new study from the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston found that smoking traditional cigarettes -- in addition to being harmful to the health of any children around the smoker - causes kids to miss more days of school.

Some smokers have switched to the e cigarette to avoid giving off harmful smoke, but those who haven't are causing their children to have higher absenteeism rates than non-smokers. This in turn has led to lower performances in school and more costs to the family.

The nationwide study was published on September 5th in a pediatrics journal and it backs up earlier findings from similar studies conducted in California and New Jersey. In order to reach their conclusions, researchers pored over national research data relating to smoking parents and child absenteeism.

Incidence of ear infection over the previous 12 months, incidence of a cold over the previous two weeks and asthma diagnosis, among other health and demographic details were reviewed from the 2005 National Health Interview Study. Only children age six to eleven were included in the study to avoid having it tainted by older kids who smoke.

Six percent of the kids came from a home in which one parent smoked and 14 percent from a household in which both parents smoked. The remaining 80 percent of students came from homes that were more highly educated, earned higher incomes and were more likely to be Latino.

The findings showed that children living in homes with smokers missed more school time than others. Harmful second-hand smoke is one of the top reasons for smokers give for quitting or making the switch to the smokeless e cig.

It was determined that 24% of the absences experienced by children from smoking homes came as a direct result of the second-hand smoke. On top of the hit their education takes as a result of those missed days, the kids' families also were hit financially.

Parents had to take time off of work and/or hire caregivers to take care of the children, no too mention all of the physicians' bills. The money spent on caregivers alone was estimated to be $227 million. If the health issues don't convince smokers to buy electronic cigarettes instead, perhaps the lost money will.

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