Vocational Nursing and Your Bright Future

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A Licensed Vocational Nurse is an entry-level health care source who regularly works directly under a Registered Nurse or physician, and handles various day to day patient care duties. Becoming a Licensed Vocational Nurse, give a chance to work directly with people who really need help and who can make an actual change in their lives with your involvement. In addition, many experts from health care industry believe that in next few years the employment opportunities in vocational nursing will sour up.

The work responsibility of vocational nurses mostly involves the caring patient who is sick, injured or disabled under the direction of physicians. Licensed nurses also have the authority to care and give injections, along with supervise catheters, bandage and clean wounds, give massages and alcohol rubs along with administering enemas. The required nature of the direction and management in vocational nursing may vary according to job setting. They have to help immobile patients get dressed, bathe, and take care of other issues in regards to basic personal hygiene, along with taking care of their diet, consumption and exercise.

Making a career in the vocational nursing is not so hard. The first step toward being a Licensed Vocational Nurse is to enroll in, and successfully complete the required hours of training in an LVN program accredited by the state's licensing body. Admission requirements for most LVN programs state that the applicant is a minimum of 17 years of age and holds a high school diploma or equivalency and are reasonably representative of what is required by programs in other states.

The next step to become an LVN is earning your vocational nursing license. Becoming licensed requires you to successfully pass a regular evaluation known as the NCLEX-PN, which is a multiple-choice test intended to confirm your knowledge of the following four things:

  • Physiological integrity
  • Health promotion and maintenance
  • Effective and safe care environment
  • Fundamentals of psychosocial integrity

As per recent observations made by the chief health care industry experts of the United States, this field is expected to grow 14 percent in next few years. A career in nursing requires the utmost responsibility as the job has a lot to do with supervision. Licensed vocational nurses are well versed with the knowledge on how to complete all of the medical forms which are a compulsory prerequisite prior to any form of treatment in a medical institution. Vocational nurses have the option of working in a general field of healthcare or specializing in a particular healthcare setting such as a rehabilitation center, a nursing home or a doctor's office.

As with any other occupation, LVNs have a wide pay scale influenced by various factors but the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics did report in 2011 that the average annual salary for the occupation ranges from $28,912 to $55,120. This range in income is influenced by such variables as which region of the state the LVN works in, the type of medical facility where she or he is employed, the individual's amount of work experience.

A program in vocational nursing can prepare you for a rewarding career and direct you to the successful career pathway. Specializing in this field needs proper training and so the range of conceptualized curriculum of the respective program is an important part. Making a right selection of nursing program can offer a better foundation for reliable utilization and acquisition of knowledge required for doing well in vocational nursing.

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