Microsoft OneNote: Overview of Microsoft OneNote

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Microsoft OneNote is a powerful, but often overlooked, application that ships as part of the Home and Student Edition and Ultimate Edition of Microsoft Office 2007. Because of its growing popularity and utility, Microsoft has made the decision to include OneNote with every edition of Office 2010. In short, OneNote is not going away.

So, what is OneNote?

Very simply, OneNote is an application used to create digital 3-ring notebooks where you can store, organize, tag, and search electronic information such as: text, images, audio files, video files, PDFs, hyperlinks, emails, and printouts from other applications.

Just like a traditional 3-ring binder, OneNote notebooks contain pages that are organized into different sections (tabs). OneNote is a time and money saver. Unlike traditional 3-ring binders, you can search for information across one or more notebooks at the same time, dramatically reducing the time it takes to find what you are looking for. Using OneNote to store and organize your information electronically also reduces the need to visit your local office supply store.

One of the biggest advantages that OneNote offers is the ability to share your notebooks with others. OneNote notebooks can be saved on a networked file server or in a SharePoint library so that many people, regardless of physical location, can access the same data in a truly collaborative environment.

How can OneNote be used?

A new OneNote notebook is a blank canvas, the possibilities are endless.

It can be used at home to store personal information such as vacation plans, recipes, photos, do-it-yourself articles, and important documents.

It can be used at school too. Students can use OneNote to store and organize class notes, plan and organize for research papers and projects. Teachers can use OneNote to easily distribute instructor notes, class plans, and other instructional materials.

OneNote really shines at work. It can be used to help decrease costs and increase productivity in so many different ways.

Project managers can use OneNote to store all project related information in one place. No more searching for important data in file folders, email folders, or web bookmark folders. All important project data can be stored in one place – OneNote.

Project team members can use shared notebooks to collaborate and brainstorm ideas. Shared notebooks allow team members in difference geographic locations to collaborate in real time. Data in shared notebooks are synched so that users can work offline and then automatically upload their chances once they are back online.

Sales staff can create notebooks to keep track of client data, contacts, travel itineraries, entertainment information, and receipts.

Summary

The uses for OneNote listed in this article are just the tip of the iceburg. If you own either the Home & Student or Ultimate editions of Microsoft Office 2007, or any version of Office 2010, you have OneNote. Use Microsoft OneNote to help organize your personal, school, and work life.

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