Does Salary Mean Slavery to a Personal Trainer?

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I get asked a lot of questions from new personal trainers about which route to go down when entering the fitness industry. There seems to be a lot of different options so I can understand why trainers get confused. A lot of trainers seem to be put off by the idea of going self employed straight away and feel that working in a gym environment will help develop the skills needed to go it alone. 

I personally went straight in to be being a free lance trainer but I can see why people have reservations because of the apparent stigma that surrounds being self employed. I have never worked in a gym, however I do feel that personal trainers should carefully consider their options before going down the route of gym first and then self employed. It is my opinion that they are totally different things and perhaps don't give the trainer the skills that they think they will receive by going this way. 

In gym environments, the selling skills you have are incredible as people generally aren't looking for a personal trainer on top of their gym membership. If they are, then most people do not want to pay very much for the privilege either. This puts huge pressure on the trainers as they normally compete with large numbers of other trainers for the clients at the gym. If you have the sales skills and can approach people then you should do well in this environment. If you haven't then  it is incredibly difficult to pick these skills up without proper training. 

If a trainer chooses the employed route, it can have a negative effect on work ethic as the salary will always come in each month. This doesn't create any pressure to be more successful hence I see why a lot of trainers don't stick with the job or the industry. This is where the slavery comes in and personal training becomes just another job. This then means the motivation levels may drop leading to poor client recruitment and retention. 

I would say that by being self employed you have to succeed otherwise no money comes in, it forces you to learn the skills and develop yourself better. In an industry where things always change and the need to be better at sales and marketing is as important as ever, I think the added pressure of being your own boss can make you a better personal trainer. 

 

Hi I'm John Hill, Director of business development for Inspiring Fitness personal trainers. We pride ourselves on supporting personal trainers to succeed in business. We offer guaranteed client enquiries for the life of your business, unlimited support and growth and development opportunities. 

http://johnhill.inspiringfitness.co.uk

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