Home: Authors: Patrick Oconnor

Status: Member since January 22, 2009
Location: United States of America
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Patrick C. O'Connor has been president of O'Connor & Associates since 1983 and is a recipient of the prestigious MAI designation from the Appraisal Institute. He is also an registered senior property tax consultant in the state of Texas and has written numerous articles in state and national publications on reducing property taxes. He continues to set the standard in direction and quality of our appraisal products, adding services ranging from business valuations and business appraisals to cost segregation analysis for income tax reduction.

Thousands of homeowners take advantage of the Over 65 exemption allowed by the Texas Property Tax Code. After years of working and paying taxes, it's about time you get a break, right? But what about when you finally retire to that house on the lake, or some other destination you've always dreamed about? Does the Over 65 exemption go with you? If you remain in Texas, proportionately, it does!
Taxes are your enemy, but tax deductions are your friends. Taxes are the great bane of most businesses. Alas, business deductions act as a salve to cool the burning and itching of your bank account.
The countdown to May 31 - the last day Texas homeowners can submit an appeal to protest their property taxes - is growing closer by the minute. Each year, Texas homeowners pay a collective total in the millions on their property taxes. Yet, there is a 70% chance of lowering taxes when an owner appeals the assessment!
The Texas Property Tax Code for many years had required owners of business personal property (BPP) to annually render those assets used in a business. Rendering is summarizing to the central appraisal district the ownership and value of the assets. Historically, however, over half of all owners of business personal property have not rendered.
The cost approach was historically prepared as a part of most commercial real estate appraisals. However, the compunction to include the cost approach (when it was not relevant) has dissipated over the last 20 years.
Homeowners are amazed to learn they can obtain a copy of the appraisal district's evidence at a nominal cost. This is referred to as a House Bill 201 package, and is the only information many homeowners use to successfully reduce their property taxes.
Hurricane Ike inflicted a steep penalty on the Texas Gulf coast. However, there is an inconspicuous benefit – casualty loss tax deductions. Taxpayers may be able to take a 2008 deduction if either personal or business property was damaged by Hurricane Ike.
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